Teens on Wheels: Get Them Road Ready

Sooner or later, you know your children will want to learn how to drive. It’s a milestone for many teenagers and a sign of adulthood so to speak; no wonder so many parents dread the day their children are able to drive. It doesn’t have to be so nerve-wracking, though, and you know they still need you to parent them around even if they’re able to drive wherever they want now.

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Build their driving skills early, and you’ll be able to breathe a bit easier. The practising can start at a much earlier age than you might assume – and there is a lot of learning that doesn’t involve them driving around on their own.

Here is a quick guide to how you can get your teenager or pre-teen road ready a bit faster, making them the best driver of their group when it’s time to get that license.

Talk about driving in the car

If you, like so many of us, felt lost and confused during math lessons in high school, you know very well how important it is to explain every step. The teacher finds solutions to the problem on the blackboard, scribbling it down and thinking aloud, but you still have no idea how they found the solution; that’s the feeling you don’t want your teenager to have when learning how to drive.

Driving comes easier to some than to others, and it’s a good idea to talk to them about driving from an early age. When they reach the right age, you might want to consider letting them take over the steering wheel on short trips without a lot of traffic, such as to your local mall or the grocery shop. Let them drive around a bit in the parking lot, and they’ll be ready to ace that driving test in no time.

Get them a Limited Learner Permit

Your teenager can sign up for educational classes when they reach the age of fourteen and a half. By completing all the classes, either at their school or a commercial driving school, they’ll be able to progress to apply for a driver license by obtaining a Limited Learner Permit. There are a lot of strict requirements for this, though, and they will of course need permission from a parent or a guardian to obtain it.

The restrictions are just as comprehensive as the requirements as well, and they will only be allowed to drive when a sober and responsible supervisor is seated next to them.

Keep in mind that they may be able to lose their Limited Learner Permit a lot easier than it was to obtain it, so it’s a lot of good reasons to stay in school and keeping out of trouble. Get in touch with Twiford Law if you need help with any traffic violations or driver license issues in general; without professional help, they might see their license suspended for up to twelve months.

That’s another twelve months of playing taxi for them, after all.

When they have all the basic requirements, and you suspect that they might grow up to be a responsible driver, it’s a good idea to sign them up for a defensive driving course. It gives them the kind of traffic skills they don’t teach in regular driving schools, and you can rest a bit easier when you know that they’re safe and responsible behind the wheel.